Straparola, Giovanni Francesco. “The Fourth Fable: Tebaldo, Prince of Salerno…” The Nights of Straparola, translated by W.G. Waters and illustrated by F. R. Hughes, London: Lawrence and Bullen, 1894, volume 1, pp. 35-44.

Item

Title

Straparola, Giovanni Francesco. “The Fourth Fable: Tebaldo, Prince of Salerno…” The Nights of Straparola, translated by W.G. Waters and illustrated by F. R. Hughes, London: Lawrence and Bullen, 1894, volume 1, pp. 35-44.

Description

This persecuted maiden tale in Straparola’s book of tales is the first fairy tale presented in his collection. This story can be identified by the use of magic liquor that keeps the princess alive during her time hidden in a chest. This story of Tebaldo and Doralice is narrated by a woman and concludes with justice served to the antagonistic man and a happily ever after for the princess. In this ending , we see evidence of the book’s dedication to women.

Alternative Title

The Nights of Straparola

Creator

Giovanni Francesco Straparola

Contributor

E. R. Hughes, A. R. W. S.

Spatial Coverage

London

Coverage

England

Publisher

Lawrence and Bullen

Date

1894

Temporal Coverage

1890-1899

Identifier

Persecuted Maidens

Abstract

The widowed Prince Tebaldo promised his late wife he would only remarry a woman who could wear her ring. Upon discovering this woman was his daughter, he made plans to wed her. The daughter consulted her nurse who helped her escape by hiding her in a chest with a magic liquor that would keep her alive. The prince had the chest sold to a merchant who then sold it to the King of England. The princess spent every day in the King’s palace perfecting his quarters while he was away, and one day the King pretended to leave so he could discover who was the person doing this kind task. He found the princess at work and planned to marry her right away, then they had two children together. Tebaldo, still furious with the princess’s escape, set off to find her and exact his revenge. He made his way to the King’s palace in England and used disguises to convince his daughter, who did not recognize him, to allow him to sleep in a room with her children. After she agreed, Tebaldo stole her knife to kill the children and then planted the bloody knife back on her so she would be accused of the murder. The King had her buried up to her head as to torture her to death, but when Tebaldo went home he explained the situation to the princess’s nurse who then rode to England to set the story straight. The King believed her and had Tebaldo executed, then they all live happily together for many years.

Relation

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